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Archive for February, 2010

Obama Team Connects The Dots Between Mass Killings And National Security | Enough

the administration’s point man on national security and intelligence included in this year’s global threat assessment a section devoted to “mass killings” – a “persistent feature of the global landscape,” the report said. Though the actual substance of the brief section is not groundbreaking for those attuned to civilian atrocities committed around the world, the inclusion of the term is significant, signaling a worldview that defines national security threats in a broader, more global framework.

The section states:

“Looking ahead over the next five years, a number of countries in Africa and Asia are at significant risk for a new outbreak of mass killing…Among these countries, a new mass killing or genocide is most likely to occur in Southern Sudan.”

By linking U.S. security concerns and mass killings, the administration has also changed the policy outlook toward genocide and civilian atrocities—as national security threats rather than just humanitarian concerns.

Changing the way the issue gets seen and tracked, following the recommendations of the Genocide Prevention Task Force.

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

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Legal std used to reject genocide charge for Bashir was wrong

The legal error was the one the Prosecution identified in its appeal brief. As the Appeals judgment summarized it:  “. . . requiring that the existence of genocidal intent must be the only reasonable conclusion amounts to requiring the Prosecutor to disprove any other reasonable conclusions and to eliminate reasonable doubt. If the only reasonable conclusion based on the evidence is the existence of genocidal intent, then it cannot be said that such a finding establishes merely “reasonable grounds to believe”. Rather, it establishes genocidal intent “beyond reasonable doubt.” (para. 33, Appeals decision).

Put simply, the PTC had applied the standard of proof required for a conviction at trial to the decision of whether or not to issue an arrest warrant. This was wrong as a matter of law

This sounds to me like a deliberate political move, rather than a simple judicial error. Seems like something a first year international law student would pick up.

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

A crisis in Sudan | The Elders (by Jimmy Carter) . warning about upcoming elections

It is almost impossible to imagine the tragedy for Sudan from the resumption of war, which would undoubtedly impact the nine contiguous nations. Perhaps more serious would be the risk of religious antagonisms in a much broader region, with Muslims supporting the northern region against allies of the south. It is crucial that the United Nations and individual countries intercede to ensure the full implementation of the 2005 CPA with aggressive and sustained support for the faltering progress toward peace and democracy.

A pointed critique of the Sudanese regime and a clarion call to the international community to act in support of fair and free elections. (also published in the Washington Post)

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

Inner City Press: As Obama’s Speech Omits Sudan, Susan Rice Says Jobs Come First, Gration on Case

Were they misreading the omission of Sudan and genocide from the lengthy speech as reflecting a lessing of commitment on these issues by the Obama administration?

Yes, Ambassador Rice said, this is a misinterpretation. She said the speech has correctly focused on jobs and the American economy, not every foreign policy issue could be mentioned. She said the Administration remains “deeply committed,” and mentioned for the second time this week the work of U.S. envoy on Sudan Scott Gration. Video here, transcript below.

Trying to reassure activists disappointed by Obama’s not saying anything about genocide prevention in the State of the Union address.

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations