Archive

Archive for January, 2010

Eugene Volokh: Index on Censorship Self-Censors in Article About Yale University Press’s Self-Censorship

The Index of Censorship ran an interview with Jytte Klausen, which was titled (at least in the online version) “See No Evil,” and began this way:

Jytte Klausen talks to Index on Censorship about her new book on the Danish cartoons crisis and discusses why it was published without any illustrations

Jytte Klausen’s book The Cartoons That Shook the World (published by Yale University Press) is the first scholarly examination of the notorious controversy that erupted in 2006. Klausen is a respected scholar: she won the Carnegie Scholars Award for her research on Muslims in Europe and is professor of comparative politics at Brandeis University in the US. Three years ago, she set out to unravel the genesis of the debacle and to analyse the cartoons and their impact. Last summer, several months before publication, Yale University Press unexpectedly took the decision not to publish the cartoons in her book. After reading Klausen’s manuscript in the spring, the director of the press, John Donatich, was ambivalent about republishing the cartoons: on grounds of taste, offence and the possibility that it might reignite the conflict. He also noted that the cartoons were available for readers to see online. He consulted Yale University who assembled an advisory panel of diplomats, academics and US and UK counter-terrorism officials who advised that there was a strong chance of violence breaking out if the cartoons were published. Klausen was told that she could only read the gagging order. Not only were the cartoons removed from the book, but historic illustrations of Mohammed that Klausen had wanted to include to illustrate her thesis were also omitted. When the story leaked to the American press last summer, Yale was widely criticised for undermining academic freedom. Christopher Hitchens described it as “the latest and perhaps the worst episode in the steady surrender to religious extremism”. In a statement, Yale University Press defended its decision with reference to the expert panel’s advice “that there existed a substantial likelihood of violence that might take the lives of innocent victims”. John Donatich took full responsibility for the final decision, but there have been concerns at the university’s intervention in the press’s independence.

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

Mr. President, What About Sudan? | Stop Genocide | Change.org

Mr. President, What About Sudan?

Published January 31, 2010 @ 07:22AM PT

Barack ObamaPost-State of the Union frustration among anti-genocide activists was palpable. Certainly, A glimpse at the #genprev (short for genocide prevention) hashtag on Twitter gives a sense of the expectations leading up to President Obama’s speech and the disappointment at the realization that, if anything, Sudan might just get a passing mention when the president shifted from domestic issues to foreign policy … and then, no, not even then.

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

Haiti Earthquake Support Center | do micro-work for something you’re passionate about at www.beextra.org

The Extraordinaries has created this support page to harness the power of the crowd to help locate and identify missing persons with just a few minutes of your time.

On January 12, 2010, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake rocked Haiti, killing over 70,000 people and leaving the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince in ruins. The damage this disaster has caused is still unmeasurable as friends and families around the globe try to contact loved ones while thousands of others continue searching for ways to help.

One way to contribute helping people in Haiti locate the missing

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

Haiti information service launched by Thomson Reuters Foundation | Reuters

Haiti information service launched by Thomson Reuters Foundation

Sun Jan 17, 2010 10:14am EST

PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI, Jan 17 – The Thomson Reuters Foundation has today launched a first-of-its kind, free disaster-information service for the people of Haiti. The service allows survivors of Haiti’s earthquake to receive critical information by text message directly to their phones, free of charge

One of a number of tech initiatives by media companies and activists such as Ushahidi and Instedd

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

African Union: Address Justice and Accountability | Human Rights Watch

African Union: Address Justice and Accountability
Letter to AU Heads of State in Advance of Addis Ababa Summit
January 21, 2010

Your Excellency,

Human Rights Watch welcomes the initiative by the African Union to use its 14th summit (January 25 – February 2, 2010) as a forum to review, among other matters, the state of peace and security on the continent, and to debate related issues of good governance, justice, and human rights.

In August 2009, during their special session in Tripoli, the Heads of State declared 2010 the “Year of Peace and Security in Africa.” This momentous dedication represents African leaders’ stated commitment to redouble their efforts to seek sustainable solutions to ongoing armed conflicts in Africa.

As preparations for the 14th annual summit move forward, Human Rights Watch commends the African Union and its Peace and Security Council for action taken so far to address the humanitarian and human rights implications of those conflicts. At the same time, Human Rights Watch calls for renewed and stronger attention to several ongoing crises and issues such as civilian protection and impunity which, if not dealt with adequately, will continue to undermine Africa’s aspirations for peace and security

Serious accountability would change everything…

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

Print Story: Reporters put Twitter, Facebook to ‘Big Brother’ test – Yahoo! News

Reporters put Twitter, Facebook to ‘Big Brother’ test

PARIS (AFP) – Five journalists plan to lock themselves away in a French farmhouse with access only to Facebook and Twitter to test the quality of news from the social networking and micro-blogging sites.

Twitter and Facebook’s use as news-breaking tools has been highlighted over the past year, particularly during opposition protests in Iran that many media described as a “twitterised revolution.”

This month, Twitter once again played a key communications role in quake-hit Haiti, with users sending harrowing personal accounts, heart-rending pictures and cries for help.

But how would the world look if viewed only through the prism of these sites, whose phenomenal growth has been fuelled by smartphones and, for Twitter, online bursts of 140 characters?

Better than being locked in a room with only access to CNN and Fox

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations

Internews: Media Coordinating Relief in Haiti – Pulitzer Center Untold Stories

Internews: Media Coordinating Relief in Haiti

 

Summer Marion, Pulitzer Center
Images and video by Jennifer Glasse, Internews

Food distribution
A food distribution queue in Haiti this week

Haiti’s infrastructural devastation in the wake of last week’s earthquake highlights media’s critical role in facilitating relief efforts. Mark Frohardt knows this all too well. Frohardt is Vice President for Health and Humanitarian Media at Internews, an international media and development organization mandated to empower local media. He and his team arrive in disaster areas at the height of crises to fill gaps in information sharing and provide local media outlets with the necessary tools to rebuild.

Posted via web from Ted’s Nothing but Net Explorations